Succulent September

I love collecting vintage telephone pole insulators. Although, I hadn’t figured out a cool way to display them until recently. I finally realized it was the perfect little planter for my  favorite little plant,  the succulent.  I think I may use copper and twine to hang them in the house… I’ll let you know… what would you do?

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Daylilies

My dear friend Cary Peterson LOVES Daylilies.  Once I knew about Daylilies, so did I.  I’ve always loved the Lily, but the variety and beauty that comes from a Daylily is unparralled.  In the fall, Cary gave me my first Daylily as a gift.  I planted it, excited to see what blooms I would get the spring.  That had to be the best part, I had no idea which one he gave me.  Well, it’s first blooms showed this week and it’s heart stopping gorgeous.   I’m still waiting to hear which one it is – but I’m guessing on “Too Many Husbands” .  I can’t wait to get more types to add some color and beauty into my flower gardens!  Cary operates http://www.mydaylilies.com and there is an extensive and fantastic gallery of flowers that you can view or even buy online.  Take a look, they are beautiful.  Thank you Cary!

I took this little blurb from www.daylilies.org to explain a little about the flowers:
“The genus Hemerocallis is native to Asia. Since the early 1930s, hybridizers in the United States and England have made great improvements in daylilies. Originally, the only colors were yellow, orange, and fulvous red. Today, we have colors ranging from near-whites, pastels, yellows, oranges, pinks, vivid reds, crimson, purple, nearly true-blue, and fabulous blends. Many people are familiar with only the common yellow or orange daylilies which are often seen along roadsides. These daylilies are cultivated forms of the wild types of daylilies which have “escaped” and are growing as if they are wild. All the modern daylilies have been developed through a complicated history of hybridization among these and other wild types.”

Here are a few photos I took of my Daylilies first blooms, I can’t wait to print one up and put it on the wall . . .    {A}

Pita Pizza

My husband found a Tuna Melt Pita Pizzas Recipe in a magazine awhile ago and we tried it out today – with our own twist of course.  I thought it worked so well, I just had to share.  I think this would be great for an appetizer as well.  And with the many options of pizza out there – you can get really creative with the Pita Pizza idea and make this is a lot of fun for everyone in the family to make together.  I hand-picked the dill and lettuce from my garden.  It’s great to have the little extras just outside my doorstep!

Tuna Pita Pizza

1 Can solid white tuna in water, drained
2 Tbsp. Reduced Fat Mayonnaise
1/2 Tbsp. Olive Oil
1/2 Tbsp. fresh Dill, finely chopped
1 Green Onion, finely chopped
4 Pitas (white / whole wheat)
2 Cups Baby Greens
1/2 Cup grated cheddar cheese (I plan on using Dubliner Cheese next time, we pick it up at Costco and I use it in almost everything!)
Salt and Pepper to taste

Preheat oven to 425 F.  Line a large baking sheet with parchment paper.  In a bowl, mix tuna, mayonnaise, olive oil, dill, green onion, salt and pepper.  Place the pitas on the baking sheet, then spread the tuna mixture overtop.  Sprinkle cheddar cheese on top of each pita and bake until cheese has melted, 8 to 10 minutes.  Cut each pita into wedges and top with baby greens.  Enjoy!  {A}

Tuna Pita Pizza

Tuna Pita Pizza

Going Fast, SO Yummy!

Lettuce Garden

Dill

After the Rain

It had been raining since yesterday morning, and today the clouds parted just as I arrived home.  The sun peeped out long enough for me to sneak in a few photos of the raindrops around the yard.  And then we ran inside before it started again.  I’m wishing for sun and warmth to get here, but I can’t help loving the little things that rain brings like galoshes, bright colored umbrellas, soft ground to start a garden, and indoor DIY projects.  I have a few DIYs to post soon, thanks to the rain! {A}